Stage 2: Active Processing

Ready-to-go Resources for the Thinking Classroom

Everyone loves a printable!  Check out these two ready-to-go resources for active processing. 1. Choose Your Own Adventure Graphic Organizer Need a way to help kids process the relationship between ideas or concepts in your class?  Try asking students to choose which graphic organizer best fits those ideas.  Are you discussing two ideas that are… Continue reading Ready-to-go Resources for the Thinking Classroom

Stage 2: Active Processing

Trending: Google Classroom

Sometimes technology in education leads to teachers exclaiming, “This is awesome! I can’t wait to use it. This is a game changer!” And sometimes technology in education leads to teachers wondering, “Is making the textbook digital really that big of deal?  Kids are just reading on the screen instead of on the page.  Oh and… Continue reading Trending: Google Classroom

Ed2S Fellows, Stage 2: Active Processing

Fellows Update: Active Processing in Action

Today's post comes from Ayo Magwood, an Ed2Save Fellow and amazing high school social studies teacher at the Maret School. What do you do to ensure that the learners are doing the “heavy lifting”? Despite having taught for over a decade, I still struggle with getting off the stage and ensuring that my learners are doing the "heavy… Continue reading Fellows Update: Active Processing in Action

Stage 2: Active Processing, Testing and Assessments

Are learning and achievement the same thing?

Pedro Noguera, NYU Professor of Education says, "No". They're not quite the same. When you focus on achievement, you focus on test scores and you could miss out on whether or not the kids are actually learning. From the ASCD Capital Connections Newsletter (reprinted here): Less than half of the general public, and only 30… Continue reading Are learning and achievement the same thing?

Stage 2: Active Processing

Try this: mind mapping

If you're like me, you've heard of mind maps and even thought about using them in a learning scenario -- but never got around to doing it. Some may think it's only reserved for brainstorming. Others might even feel that it's cheeky. But research shows that it improves learning for a number of reasons. It… Continue reading Try this: mind mapping

Stage 2: Active Processing

Think about…synectics

As we focus on active processing this week, consider the power of analogy in the creative thinking process. That is exactly what George Prince and William J. J. Gordon, two pioneers of synectic thinking, did. Although their work centers mainly on structures to facilitate creativity and innovation during group meetings, much of it applies to… Continue reading Think about…synectics

Stage 2: Active Processing

Active Processing in Action

What does it look like to ask very young students to actively process their learning? The students below are in 1st Grade. They have selected words that were pasted around the room and are sorting them into long a, i, o and u sounds. They also walked around and corrected any errors made by their peers.   … Continue reading Active Processing in Action

Stage 2: Active Processing

Try this: add more reflection on learning

Most psychologists agree on three distinct stages of memory: sensory, short term and long term. New knowledge must create specific pathways between short and long term in order to easily retrieve it. Asking students to reflect on their learning is a great way to create a well worn pathway between the memory storage stations. It… Continue reading Try this: add more reflection on learning

Stage 2: Active Processing, Stage 3: Critical Thinking

Trending: Explore first, explain second

We welcome a trend away from an era of anti-intellectualism where teachers "tell" students what they need to know or how they need to do something and then monitor their regurgitation or rote practice of the skill. There is a push to require students to explore concepts and processes on their own: to figure it… Continue reading Trending: Explore first, explain second

Stage 2: Active Processing

Think about…memory is as thinking does

Why do students struggle to remember something we've taught? Or why do they remember fragments of it but don't see how the pieces fit together? Cognitive psychologist of the University of Virginia, Daniel Willingham calls this shallow knowledge. He says, When students parrot back a teacher's or the textbook's words, they are, of course, drawing on… Continue reading Think about…memory is as thinking does